This release was made on 6th July 2020 and is based on mainline revision 9085. It includes support for Web Assembly, faster and lower-memory map creation, and faster routing.

The previous release, 5.12, was made on 25th March 2020 and is based on mainline revision 8838.

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CartoType is now available as a web assembly library in the desktop version of the Chrome browser. There's a simple demonstration here. It enables you to provide CartoType mapping and routing capabilities to your users in a browser window without asking them to install anything.

The web assembly version of CartoType is full-featured and contains everything that the other versions have on Windows, iOS, Android, and Linux.

 

This release was made on 25th March 2020 and is based on mainline revision 8838.

The previous release, 5.10, was made on 15th October 2019 and was based on mainline revision 8479.

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Sometimes you need the power of a full programming language when importing data. For example, you might need to load an ESRI shapefile, read records with a matching key in an associated DBF file, and loop through the records. The ChaiScript language, which can be used anywhere suitable in a CartoType makemap file inside the element <script> ... </script>, allows you to do that. It's very similar to C++, with some differences (e.g., 'int x = 0' in C++ becomes 'auto x = int(0)' in ChaiScript; there are no postincrement or postdecrement operators; etc.). This article explains the functions added to ChaiScript to make data import possible. General notes on the ChaiScript language are found on another page

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This document describes ChaiScript, an open-source (BSD license) scripting language invented by Jason Turner. It was written by examining the ChaiScript source code and searching the internet for examples and explanations. Any inaccuracies are the fault of the author.

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This release was made on 15th October 2019 and is based on mainline revision 8479.

The previous release, 5.8, was made on 26th April 2019, based on mainline revision 8175.

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This release on 26th April 2019 is based on mainline revision 8175.

Previous release 5.6 on 11th February 2019 was based on mainline revision 7972.

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Release date: 12th February 2019

Previous release: 5.4, 23rd October 2018

General

Isochrones (travel ranges) now work for the turn-expanded router

Turn-expanded router data can now be stored in serialized form, for fast loading, in CTM1 (map) files

Address data can be added to map objects at data preparation time for use by a new function, GetAddressFast, which uses data only from the map object for which an address is required

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Release date: 23rd October 2018

Previous release: 5.2, 12th July 2018

Summary of changes

SetScaleBar, SetLegend, SetCopyright and other new functions allow scale bars, legends (map keys) and copyright notices to be added to the map easily, and to be displayed properly when using hardware graphics acceleration.

Boxed labels for point objects can now optionally have small triangular pointers which indicate the exact position of the point object.

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It's possible to use the makemap tool to create very large CartoType maps (CTM1 files), up to and including a map of the whole world using the full OpenStreetMap data file planet.osm. The easiest and fastest way is to use lots of RAM.

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CartoType's graphics acceleration system gives you a smooth, fast, fluid user experience, with no delays when panning or zooming the map. Drawing speeds of up to 30 frames per second are supported.

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This document explains the CartoTypeRouteProfile XML format, used in .ctprofile files. These files are used to store route profiles, which are used to customize the behavior of the route calculation system. For example, it's possible to make some types of roads more or less preferable than others, or to forbid them entirely, and to set the type of vehicle, for instance to a car, heavy goods vehicle or bicycle.

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Here are answers to some questions frequently asked about CartoType.

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CartoType uses a standard set of map layers and attributes. These are used by the import rules built into makemap, and by the standard style sheet. You can override them completely by using your own import rules and style sheets, but it is better to use the standard set, adding new layers and attributes where needed, or omitting unnecessary ones. The reason for using the standard set is that they used by the address searching system. In general, attributes and layers are described according to how they are imported from OpenStreetMap data.

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Apple introduced the Swift programming language in 2014. It has now largely replaced Objective C to become the language of choice for iOS applications. However, CartoType's iOS API is written in Objective C. This article explains how to use the CartoType iOS SDK in a Swift project. You can use CartoType completely from Swift. There is no need to write any Objective C.

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There are several standard platform SDKS. This page tells you what languages they support and the files they consist of.

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CartoType uses XML style sheets to control the appearance of maps. Features that can be controlled include the following:

  • selection of layers
  • colors
  • transparency
  • size of features
  • SVG icons
  • lettering style and positioning
  • scales at which features appear

Style Sheets Directory